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THE WALTER W. NAUMBURG COMPETITION ANNOUNCES WINNERS OF FIRST COMPETITION FOR COMPOSERS:

DAN VISCONTI and HANNAH LASH

November 1, 2010 -- The Walter W. Naumburg Foundation announces the winners of its first ever competition for composers. Held on Friday, October 22 in New York City, the competition included 27 entries, with 8 considered for the final round, and 2 selected as winners.

The winning composers are Dan Visconti, from Virginia, who received degrees from the Cleveland Institute of Music, later studying at Yale; and Hannah Lash, who received a Ph.D. from Harvard in 2010 and is currently an artist diploma candidate at Yale where she studies with Martin Bresnick.

Each composer received a cash award of $5000. In addition, each composer will compose a chamber music work for the Da Capo Chamber Players to be premiered in New York in late December 2011 or early January, 2012. In 1973, the Da Capo Chamber Players – whose members are Patricia Spencer, flute; Meighan Stoops, clarinet; Curtis Macomber, violin; Andre Emelianoff, cello and Blair McMillen, piano – were named the recipient of a Naumburg chamber music award.

The judges for the competition included Robert Beaser, John Harbison, Ezra Laderman, Robert Mann and Ursula Oppens.

The competition was open to American citizens who were age 40 or younger. Each contestant was required to submit two different compositions for chamber music ensembles. Orchestral works were not accepted.

The Walter W. Naumburg Foundation has a longstanding association with leading composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. William Schuman served as its president from 1959-1962, as did Peter Mennin from 1964 – 1971. Composers who have been a member of Naumburg’s board of directors include from Aaron Copland, Daniel Gregory Mason, Lukas Foss, Francis Thorne, and currently Elliott Carter and John Corigliano. Two Naumburg commissioned works were selected as Pulitzer Prize winning compositions – Donald Martino’s “Notturno’ composed for Speculum Musicae (Pulitzer Prize 1974) and Leon Kirchner’s Quartet No. 3 for Strings and Electronic Tape composed for the Beaux Arts Trio (Pulitzer Prize 1967).